Article 23 Of The Nunavut Land Claims Agreement

This article appeared first on Policy Options and is re-elected under a Creative Commons license. How could the Inuit, who were only federally justified in 1960 and who were largely semi-nomadic until the early 1960s and had very few formally trained leaders, negotiate with the Canadian government a modern treaty dealing with land rights and political development that literally changed the face of Canada forever? Negotiations continued in the 1980s, with a pause in 1985 and 1986, which led the Federal Cabinet to authorize substantial changes to the overall policy of claims in which the negotiations were conducted. An agreement in principle was signed in Igloolik in April 1990 and the final agreement was signed in Iqaluit on 25 May 1993 and ratified by Parliament a few weeks later. Particular attention was given to Ottawa if the Nunavut project were to move from an agreement in principle to a final agreement within a reasonable period of time. In this sense, the collapse of the final Dene/Métis agreement in 1990 likely helped Inuit focus on the Nunavut project when policymakers in Ottawa had to provide direction on the issue of political evolution. The latest figures for the federal Inuit employment rate were released in October 2018 in the federal government`s Report on Inuit Labour Force Analysis – a 1,000-page report required under Section 23. It was supposed to come six months after the Nunavut agreement was ratified in 1993, but the October 2018 report is the first and only one of its kind. Nunavut`s 25-year campaign included negotiations, litigation, political action, community consultations, appeals to the Canadian public, two NWT-wide referendums on the concept of NWT partition and the actual dividing line, an Inuit-wide ratification vote in 1992, and parliamentary votes in 1993. . . .